Salt Lake City Opens One of USA’s First Protected Bicycle Intersections

Salt Lake City held a party yesterday afternoon to celebrate the opening of the nation’s second Dutch Junction, an intersection that offers special protection for bicyclists.  The intersection is located at 200 W and 300 S, just south of the central business district.  200 W is served by protected bike lanes.  300 S has painted bike lanes.  Both streets are very wide as is common in Salt Lake City.

The intersection design allows cyclists to navigate the busy intersection in protected lanes.  Here’s a video from the Netherlands that shows how it works as well as a couple of pictures from Google Maps that show the Dutch Junction under construction.

200 W and 300 S are both served by on street bike lanes.  Photo-Google Maps

200 W and 300 S are both served by on street bike lanes. Photo-Google Maps

Looking south on 200 W. during construction.  The islands protect cyclists from traffic and force turning cars to give more space.  Photo-Google Maps

Looking south on 200 W. during construction. The islands protect cyclists from traffic and force turning cars to give more space. Note that the protected bike lane continues beyond the intersection.  Photo-Google Maps

Looking north on 200 W as workers pour cement for one of the protective islands.  Photo-Google Maps.

Looking north on 200 W as workers pour cement for one of the protective islands. Photo-Google Maps.

Dutch Junctions are one of several popular intersection treatments in the Netherlands.  They are virtually non-existent here in the US, though they are popular with US officials because they offer an easy, common sense way of handling intersections where protected bike lanes are present.

City officials in Salt Lake City plan to analyze data concerning usage and crashes at this intersection.  If it meets or exceeds objectives, they’ve indicated that they will build more throughout the city.

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One thought on “Salt Lake City Opens One of USA’s First Protected Bicycle Intersections

  1. Pingback: Salt Lake to Ogden | Bike 5

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